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India-Gods's Abode


What we should explain to the children

What is very important is to know what you want. And for this a minimum of freedom is necessary. You must not be under a compulsion or an obligation. You must be able to do things whole-heartedly. If you are lazy, well, you will know what it means to be lazy.... You know, in life idlers are obliged to work ten times more than others, for what they do they do badly, so they are obliged to do it again. But these are things one must learn by experience. They canít be instilled into you.

The mind, if not controlled, is something wavering and imprecise. If one doesnít have the habit of concentrating it upon something, it goes on wandering all the time. It goes on without a stop anywhere and wanders into a world of vagueness. And then, when one wants to fix oneís attention, it hurts! There is a little effort there, like this: ďOh! how tiring it is, it hurts!Ē So one does not do it. And one lives in a kind of cloud. And your head is like a cloud; itís like that, most brains are like clouds: there is no precision, no exactitude, no clarity, it is hazy - vague and hazy. You have impressions rather than a knowledge of things. You live in an approximation, and you can keep within you all sorts of contradictory ideas made up mostly of impressions, sensations, feelings, emotions - all sorts of things like that which have very little to do with thought and... which are just vague ramblings. But if you want to succeed in having a precise, concrete, clear, definite thought on a certain subject, you must make an effort, gather yourself together, hold yourself firm, concentrate. And the first time you do it, it literally hurts, it is tiring! But if you donít make a habit of it, all your life you will be living in a state of irresolution. And when it comes to practical things, when you are faced with - for, in spite of everything, one is always faced with - a number of problems to solve, of a very practical kind, well, instead of being able to take up the elements of the problem, to put them all face to face, look at the question from every side, and rising above and seeing the solution, instead of that you will be tossed about in the swirls of something grey and uncertain, and it will be like so many spiders running around in your head - but you wonít succeed in catching the thing. I am speaking of the simplest of problems, you know; I am not speaking of deciding the fate of the world or humanity, or even of a country - nothing of the kind. I am speaking of the problems of your daily life, of every day. They become something quite woolly.

Well, it is to avoid this that you are told, when your brain is in course of being formed, ďInstead of letting it be shaped by such habits and qualities, try to give it a little exactitude, precision, capacity of concentration, of choosing, deciding, putting things in order, try to use your reason.Ē Of course, it is well understood that reason is not the supreme capacity of man and must be surpassed, but it is quite obvious that if you donít have it, you will live an altogether incoherent life, you wonít even know how to behave rationally. The least thing will upset you completely and you wonít even know why, and still less how to remedy it. While someone who has established within himself a state of active, clear reasoning, can face attacks of all kinds, emotional attacks or any trials whatever; for life is entirely made up of these things - unpleasantness, vexations which are small but proportionate to the one who feels them, and so naturally felt by him as very big because they are proportionate to him. Well, reason can stand back a little, look at all that, smile and say, ďOh! no, one must not make a fuss over such a small thing.Ē

If you do not have reason, you will be like a cork on a stormy sea. I donít know if the cork suffers from its condition, but it does not seem to me a very happy one.

There, then.

Now, after having said all this - and itís not just once I have told you this but several times I think, and I am ready to tell it to you again as many times as you like - after having said this, I believe in leaving you entirely free to choose whether you want to be the cork on the stormy sea or whether you want to have a clear, precise perception and a sufficient knowledge of things to be able to walk to - well, simply to where you want to go.

For there is a clarity thatís indispensable in order to be able even to follow the path one has chosen.

I am not at all keen on your becoming scholars, far from it! For then one falls into the other extreme: one fills oneís head with so many things that there is no longer any room for the higher light; but there is a minimum that is indispensable for not... well, for not being the cork.

-THE MOTHER
(Ibid. Vol. 8,pp.182-84)